Step by Step – How to Make Medieval Pavise (1/72nd scale)

They are available in Sets like Miniart’s French Foot Soldiers with Rams or Zvezda’s French Infantry of the Hundred Years War..but they come unpainted, there´s too few of them, and I’m too lazy to spend hours straining my eyes to paint them ( they wouldn’t turn out well anyway ).

So..I came up with this;

1. First up..tools etc. wood-glue (not in pic) Scissors, sharp-blade, cocktail stick, Thin cardboard, wood-grain and shield pattern printouts. The wood-grain and shield patterns I got of the web..and re-sized…there are tons of them about but look out for copyright.

2. Slice the cocktail-stick in half (lengthways) and place on the glue smeared cardboard surface. It´s best to leave a bit of the cocktail-stick sticking out as you´ll see later.

3. Cut the shield pattern out leaving a decent edge all around and place as near as possible with the center of the shield over the cocktail-stick, which will form the central rib. You have to make sure that about half a cm at the top of the shield is stuck just to the cardboard. The little bit of the cocktail stick that is poking out the bottom can be used to align or push/pull the rib into position. Using your finger nails, push the paper pattern firmly onto the rib and the backing. Turn the whole thing over and apply the wood-grain pattern , making sure that the grain is properly aligned. You can check this by holding the shield up to the light.

4. Let everything dry and cut out. I´ve found, that to remove the sticking out bit of cocktail stick it´s best to use a sharp blade. The shield now looks like this;

5. With the edge of the nib from a marker ( I forgot to put it in the top pic!!! 😀 ) colour in the edges. I´ve used brown, but red would look nice as well 😀 (I certainly won´t get any work as a “Hand model” :-D)

6. Lay the shield along the marker pen and with your thumb press down. This gives the shield it´s final curved shape.

7. A stand can be made using a paper staple. Simply make a hole up behind the paper on the back of the Pavise, insert the staple (with a bit of PVA) glue) let it dry, bend it to the angle required and cut to length.

I hope this little how to is useful and obviously this can be used for making 28mm Pavise and probably would allow a lot more detail.

Coates & Shine Set 8154 Indian Infantry IV BC

As many other ancient armies, Ancient Indian ones was mostly composed by infantry men. Forgotten by history, these men taken from the lower social caste, fight against Alexander the Great, but also joint him after Poros defeat, in Hidaspes battle.

Most of the Indian infantry was formed by archers and spear-men, well represented in the set. They used bamboo bows almost so tall as they was. Arrows were carried in large baskets in their back.

Some figures wear leather protection on chest, identifying them as heavy infantry. Armour was very uncommon in those armies, not so much as the set represent.

Second Row second figure is a “wild tribesmen auxiliary”. They usually works as archers without sword and he is the only depicted in the set.

Figure wearing feathers is mountain-men. The only difference is the absence of sword, and also is the only figure depicting these men.

The most interesting figure here is the Female Guard member. After Chandragupta Maurya king these guards was very common. Although is not sure is they fought in the battle field, is a nice detail on the set.

Clothes and weapons are well depicted here, although some variations could occur varying geographical zones and periods, figures are enough generic to cover quite well the subject.
Sculpture quality looks like all the Ancient India range by Coates & Shine. They are some flat figures, but flash is non-existent.

About the paint you can take a look to our other worked Indian sets, such Chariots and War Elephants..

You can find this set taking a look at our utility here..

nº29 – Altaya – IXO 3.7cm Flak 43 Auf (Sf) s WS

Panzer Division “Müncheberg” Germany – March 1945

Technical Details
3 Crew
1 Flak 43 37mm
300Km Range

Another of the quick German solutions to increase the anti-air protection of their units, mounting Flak guns over almost any capable platform.
This one is a Flak43 of 37mm, mounted in a 5Ton Chassis, the same issued to the Panzerwerfer 42. Most of this tractor were issued not armoured, just as tractors, but since 1944 some of them were issued with armoured cabs.
The Flak43 was a very capable weapon, firing at a 250 rounds per minute. Mounted in this platform it was capable to fire in a -9º to 90º elevation and traverse 360º. His range was between 6500 – 4800 metres, depending of the shell type used.

Altaya’s model, as usual, comes in fixed transport mode. This one don’t looks specially good, although the quality is the IXO standard the Flak itself looks pretty bad. Even this, the basket used to collect fired shells looks good.

It’s not a very common subject in our scale, but a high quality ones can be found in the MACO range.

nº28 – Altaya – IXO – B-4 M1931 203mm Howitzer

2nd Baltic Front – Kurland (URSS) – Spring 1945

Technical Details
15 Crew.
203mm.

This monster of 19Tons needed around 15 men for firing service. It was capable to fire high explosive shells of 98,8 Kg with a range of around 18Km. Around 871 units were built and after the war it was modified to fire nuclear shells. It was in service until 70’s, when was replaced by the M1975, also 203mm.
Firing rate was low, about 1 round per 2 minutes but their destruction capability was awesome. It was deployed at Front level, and was issued specifically to destroy fortifications, bunkers and urban areas.

Altaya’s model show the usual quality of the brand, model is fixed in transport mode although the gun elevation works. There isn’t any special bad feature, maybe the worst of the model are the tracks.
Camouflage pattern is a very late war one, also used after war.
As other times, i must said that this kind of models (guns, light vehicles) looks quite well, while some of the tanks of the collection have a very bad looking and low quality details.

Again, this one is a very exclusive model in our scale, none of the major plastic manufacturers have it on their ranges, and at this moment we don’t know any metal or resin manufacturer doing it, a “big” budget in the market.
Our big brothers of the 1/35 scale can found it in the Trumpeter range.

HaT El Cid Spanish Infantry (8176)

The El Cid range along with the corresponding Moors is in my opinion, one of HaT`s better ranges. Historically, they represent the period well and as the styles of dress,weapons were pretty generic across Europe at the time they can be recruited into a Norman army, and some of the light infantry as Saxons. They are made of soft plastic, well sculpted and there is very little flash, although, due to the softness of the plastic, removal of any flash can be a bit difficult, as it just bends away from the blade. Scalpel / modelling knives, although sharp are not really thin enough for the job so I recommend using a razor blade, which needs cutting to a point to enable you to get in all the small corners. I also advise using a razor blade when cutting this type of plastic during converting the figures.

The set consists of 96 figures, which comes on four sprue of 24, divided into heavy and light infantry types. There are 8 heavy infantry poses and 8 light infantry poses, which means a few of the poses are repeated 8 times within the set.

All 16 poses

Some of the light infantry after head transplants

 

The same, heavy infantry part of the set, painted up as their northern “neighbours”, the Normans. A pretty versatile set…useful as Normans, Iberians or early crusaders.

A couple of the heavy infantry painted as Normans and stood alongside the Strelets Norman infantry.

The one really big difference between the HaT and the Strelets figures, the HaT ones have their shields held to the left or right sides of their bodies….the Strelets ones have them held forward. When the two sets are combined this has an advantage. The Strelets figures can be used to form the front part of the shield wall, the Hat Figures can be used to form protection to the left and right flanks. Combine this with a few of the figures from the Strelets Norman infantry on the march set to fill out the rear and you have a pretty decent looking battle line. The bottom photo shows 21 figures on a 12cm by 8cm Impetus wargames sized base.

If you are looking for this set, try our utility to find it at best prices.

German LeFH 18. 1/72 Sets with crew

Although some other manufacturers have this gun in their range, only three of them provides some kind of crew for it. From past to recent they are Revell, Zvezda and now the new Armourfast ones.

Left: Armourfast Center: Zvezda Right: Revell

It was the standard divisional field howitzer used by the Wehrmacht during the Second World War. It was designed and developed by Rheinmetall in 1929-30 and entered service with the Wehrmacht in 1935.
LeFH 18 was developed in 3 different versions, the LeFH 18, LeFH 18M (1941), which incorporates a new muzzle brake and the recoil system adjusted to allow the use of a more powerful charge and new long-range shell and finally the 10.5 cm leFH 18/40, mounting the gun on the carriage for a 7.5 cm PaK 40, additionally, a more efficient muzzle (which also upgraded some of the 18M version).

Revell 02515 German Artillery.

Revell model was the first to appear, in 1995. Set is an excellent show case of the Revell’s better works in our scale. The two guns included in the set, depicts the early LeFH 18 gun, without muzzle, and with pressed steel wheels, although it comes with a full horse limber, a missed good opportunity to include the wooden wheels. Set also have a full crew for the firing gun and a lot of excellent extras, such munition, helmets and so. Instructions are clear enough and guns have a very good detail, taking care that they are made in soft plastic.
As other times an excellent full review can be found at Plastic Soldier Review site.
This Revell model is also usable for the Spanish civil War, as this early version was shipped to Spain as part of the Condor Legion.

Zvezda 6121 – German 105mm Howitzer with Crew

The Zvezda’s set only comes with two crew men, which maybe is good for their gaming system, but not so good for other purposes. Figures have the usual good quality of the brand, but their are just two. Gun is depicted in the box as the 18M gun, the muzzle brake is clearly visible, but it looks more like the 40 version, although this muzzles also upgraded some 18M versions in the late war. Which definitively seems to be a 40 version is the carriage and wheels, which looks to be the Pak 40 ones and the modified wheels designed just for this gun, some taller than the Pak 40 ones, but smaller than the other LeFH 18 versions. Figures seems to be to classic German soldiers, more appropriated for the early war, but the gun is the last version, appropriated for the late war, so at this point Armourfast crew could be good for the Zvezda’s gun.
Plastic is quite rigid, instructions are easy and gun is mounted with just a few parts.

Our mate Cristian Florescu made an excellent review about this set in the Braille Scale Discussion Group.

Armourfast 89001 LEFH 18 Howitzer 105mm

The Armourfast version seems to be the real 18M ones, taking care of the muzzle shape. I’m not sure about the wheels, maybe this time they are wooden spoked ones ?. Crew figures are probably quite good, details are very good, and maybe the discussion could be around the poses itself. For my taste the quality of these figures are better than previous Armourfast figure set, they are hard plastic and looks pretty well. They need glue to fix the multi-part, this allow no plastic excess at any point and flash is non existent, have mould lines, but are easy to fix. These figures are all wearing anklets, a late war feature.
Instructions come in the box rear, they are clear enough to build the gun.

Figure comparison, Armourfast crew are thicker but well detailed
Zvezda figures close to the Armourfast officer. Both quite compatibles.

Conclusion
So 17 years after the Revell’s launch, their set continues to be the most complete ones. Not only by the excellent crew, it also comes full of munition and boxes and the complete limber. Although soft plastic is an odd. The new Armourfast ones is clearly oriented for wargaming environment, but we though it’s a great product for this purpose, 4 crew men per gun, robust, and shape detail in figures. Also we like the style of these figures, discussion about the poses apart. Zvezda ones is a product which don’t gets happy to much people, 2 crew is a joke and detail level of the gun also is nothing special, a wargaming product less useful than the Armourfast, even if sculpture in the figures is better. Both sets lacks of munitions, boxes and so, which is a pity.

With the three sets seems that we have the three LeFH 18 versions available for our armies.

Minor faults are present in all the sets, which have a quite simplified detail, the worst in the Armourfast could be the absence of a sight, and detail missing in the lower shield. The most ugly in the Zvezda’s ones is the gun itself, you may drill and drill to get this muzzle looking well. Also you may drill the Revell’s and Armourfast’s ones. Zvezda and Armourfast are the most robust, as correspond for wargaming models.

 

What we miss now is a decent winter crew for these guns, to combine with all the leFH 18 available in the market, such for example the ACE ones, with 18M and 40 versions. Note than the box illustration for the 18M comes without muzzle, which is incorrect. Also some resin manufactures have the LeFH 18 in their ranges.
A set in the way of the recently released Orion Russian Artillery Crew could be welcome for the German guns.
By the way , we also recommend to take a look to the excellent MMS material, such this.

Armourfast team at full.