Tag Archives: Dragon

1/72 Dragon LRDG Patrol Car w/Lewis Gun – finished

After one of the most challenging constructions since I build scale models, I finally managed to paint this little kit from Dragon. For the first time, I used Mr. Gunze Hobby Color acrylics; these are very fine paints, with a longer drying time compared to Vallejo, the paints I used so far. This is useful for airbrush, as for the hand brush nothing beats Vallejo.

I must mention again the excellent upgrading set from Hauler, it was a great addition and I strongly recommend it. I plan a little diorama, somewhere in north Africa, but my searches for some decent SAS figurines were fruitless so far.

I weathered the entire model with several layers of oil paints, and added a small amount of pigments at the end.

I still don’t like my photos against white background, but I know I’ll keep trying 🙂

_MG_8793-001 _MG_8795-002 _MG_8797-003 _MG_8799-004 _MG_8803-005 _MG_8804-006 _MG_8805-007

Dragon LRDG Patrol Car w/Lewis Gun – construction done

After a short review I started the construction of what proved to be one of the most challenging braille scale projects I have ever built. It was both expensive and time consuming, and the kit itself delivers too little for how much it costs. I had to buy an aftermarket PE set from Hauler and a set of resin wheels from the same Czech manufacturer in order to fix a least some of the problems.

All the major parts of the constructed kit are not glued permanently. Beside the PE set I scratched a few details myself, and replaced others, while for the “textile” parts I used Milliput. The front turn signals are entirely scratched, as Dragon “forgot” to include them in the kit. There are few more details to add: a Lee-Enfield rifle and some small tools, and, of course the Lewis Gun. For the sand mats mounted on top of the front fenders, I’m thinking of using Milliput also, it was a first time for me and proved to be a very useful material.

This time I will use Mr. Hobby Acrylics paints instead of my usual Vallejo. It will be sandy yellow with patches of light blue.

In conclusion, this is a great subject but a mediocre kit, don’t be fooled by the nice covering box, some efforts are required to turn this Chevy into a good model for display.

_MG_8604-001 _MG_8605-002 _MG_8606-003 _MG_8607-004

_MG_8615-012 _MG_8608-005 _MG_8618-015

Dragon – 7439 – Long Range Desert Group Patrol Car w/Lewis Gun

Recently I’ve seen a picture of a LRDG Chevy used by the British army in the desert in WWII, and I instantly fell in love with it. I checked the offer in 1/72 scale and found this Dragon kit. _MG_8313-004

Well, what’s inside this box doesn’t provide the quality you would normally expect from a Dragon kit… at least from their golden era. Though there are good parts, the general impression is the kit was done in a hurry.

_MG_8314-005 _MG_8312-001

The biggest disappointment are the wheels; they are one piece, not like the CAD drawings on the box showing separate tires and wheel rims. All four road wheels look the same, but in reality the bolt circles of the back wheels is noticeably larger. The tire tread is not very deep and a there is an ugly moulding seam, whose removal will further damage the surface. And there is more bad news: all wheels were moulded with a hollow back!

So I’ve searched for a good PE set and Hauler came to my rescue. Besides metal parts, you get two beautiful Lee Enfields, a crate, some cans, a shovel – all in resin.

_MG_8317-008

_MG_8323-012

Hauler also provides, as a separate upgrading set, four road wheels and two spares, an excellent representation of the real thing. _MG_8318-009

With the Dragon wheels.

_MG_8322-011 _MG_8321-010

In conclusion, this is rather a mediocre kit compared with Dragon’s own high standard visible in their previous releases. At least an upgrade set for the wheels is a welcome addition.

Model available in our searcher, here.

Dragon M4A1 (76) W VVSS

I love Dragon Shermans, and especially the M4A1 with the 76 mm gun. I also think, as other Sherman lovers, it has the most “sexy” lines from all M4 range. I chose a registration from “Operation Cobra” with the distinctive black patches camo over the Olive Drab.

I started with the bogies; the skids were taken from an UM kit, and proved to be the ideal solution. However I had to add two more bolts on the interior of the skid, cause they were missing.

I glued the bogies into position and continued with the back engine doors. The tension mechanisms of the idler wheels was corrected, with the three bolts oriented downwards, not like Dragon indicates.

The tail lights must be moved a few millimetres back until it is aligned with the edge of the hull. I used aluminium beer can strips to simulate the brackets for fixing the tools on the hull.

The siren brush-guard was the most difficult to make, as it is not provided with the photo-etched parts in the kit.

I also modified the front fenders, as the one from the kit were incorrect.

But the most difficult part was to make and add the casting registration number on the turret. I also made a few modification, mostly on the rear of the turret, where I replaced the MG cradle and the L frames. After that I modified the loader’s split hatch into a “low profile” D94598 and add the MG barrel bracket.

The final assembly and adjustments.

After that I sprayed Vallejo Olive Drab and the camo black patches.

And the final result, after weathering with oil paints and some pigments.

 

This model is available in our utility here.

Dragon 7371 Sd.Kfz. 251 Ausf C rivetted version with Pak 35/36

Dragon makes an entire range of these half-tracked vehicles, at a very good quality. I picked it up mine for a half-track work group on Braille Scale Monthly Competition. The Pak 35/36 that comes in the box was a good addition to the vehicle.

In the box there some photo etched parts; most modellers will welcome these, but frankly I don’t understand why the lower sides of the hull are made from PE. And this is not an option, you are forced to use them. I would have been ten times happier if the gun shield of the Pak was made from PE, or even some other details. Anyway, the construction is pretty much straightforward.

First, I painted the interior:

After that I hand brushed a few layers of Vallejo’s Panzer Gray, I applied the striped camouflage as seen on the Russian front. I used Dark Sand, also from Vallejo.

A coat of gloss varnish was sprayed, as protection for the base coat. And I replaced the width indicators with ones made from thin wire.

If I remember well, this was my first time when I used oil colours for weathering. These are the final photos:

In conclusion, this is a lovely kit, and anyone who’d like to build some 1/72 Sd.Kfz. 251 half-tracks should check Dragon’s offer, as there are plenty of options.

This Dragon set and a whole bunch of Sd.Kfz. 251 options can be found through our Ebay searcher.

Sherman M4A3 (76) W from Dragon

If you are ‘shermanholic’ in Braille scale and you want to build a plastic kit, Dragon is the best option, no doubt about that. They have an entire plethora of kits, covering all major variants of this legendary allied tank. There are some minor problems, especially with the boogies in the first released batches. Another subject for debate are the tools moulded on the hull surface. Personally I don’t dislike them so much.

Doug Chaltry runs a great website dedicated to 1/72 Sherman; if you want to buy a kit, or just to read a comprehensive review, you should check it out.

This was my second build Sherman and one of my favourite projects so far. When I build a model, I like to represent, if possible, a real vehicle. This was my inspiration for the Sherman:

I started with the bogies, and added a few details:

Then I moved up to the hull. Since Dragon doesn’t provide the periscope brush guards in this kit, I had to make them from scratch. I also added the grab handles on the hatches. Dragon does provide some etched brass parts, like the brush guards for the lights and the lovely rear luggage rack.

The turret was next in line, with some extra-details also:

After that the final fitting and my Sherman was ready for the paint job.

I hand brushed a few layers of Vallejo paints; a mix of US dark green and Olive drab.

The striped winter camouflage was followed by pigments and washes, and thus I ended my project.

In conclusion, this is a great kit, an excellent build just out of the box, but also a very good platform for those who like extra-detailing.

You can found the Dragon set here in the long range of Sherman tank in 1/72 scale available in the market.

Pz.Kpfw. IV Ausf. F1 Dragon 7321

Because it is such an iconic vehicle, the backbone of the German army in WWII, I guess every serious tank modeller made at least one Pz. IV tank. When I decided to make mine in 1/72 scale, Revell was the first option. But their famous Pz IV range was no longer in production, and I couldn’t find an available kit. So I’ve turned to Dragon, and I didn’t regret it for a second.

I always loved the DAK vehicles, and this was my first attempt to represent one. I started with the construction and a small base with some ancient ruins.

The columns are scratched; In my work, I was inspired by a Panzer III diorama, in a larger scale, which I’ve spotted on a modelling website.

I painted the entire model by brush with Vallejo tan yellow. At the same time, I placed on the base some pebbles and small stones for the desert environment.

I finished the model only with acrylics. At that time I was a beginner, and lacked the experience with more advanced modelling techniques such as oil paint weathering.

Later, when I’ve learned how to use oil paints and pigments, I returned to this lovely tank, and made a few changes. And some decent photos too:

In conclusion, this an extraordinary kit, which builds perfectly out of the box, and for someone who wants to make an accurate Pz IV F1, is the best option. Good work, Dragon!

You can find this and other Dragon models through our utility here.