Tag Archives: Medieval

Strelets Normans (M001)

A nice set this one, the style is classic Strelets but the sculpting  is really very good., good proportions and poses,  clear details and vitually no Flash at all. They are made of  slightly hard plastic which always makes removing any Flash much easier and    as always,   I recommend using a razor blade, (which needs cutting to a point to enable you to get in all the small Corners) to remove any Flash.

4 sprues of 12 figs in different poses which makes 48 figures in a box. 4 figures on each sprue have ring Hands to take the weapons (which are attched to the sprue) which means that with a bit of swopping of weapons more variety can be added without any conversion. Simple conversions would be to simply replace some of the attached weapons with spears axes  or swords, which given the Forward facing poses be no problem even for a begginner. Simply remove the attached weapon flush with the Hand, use a needle to create a hole, a larger needle to expand the hole into a ring Hand and add weapon.

Historically, they represent the period well and as the styles of dress,weapons were pretty generic across Europe at the time they can be recruited into a Norman army,and mixed with the HaT El Cid  they create a really good shield wall,

2roguax
All twelve poses together ..

Some of the shields have embossed Patterns on them. Normally this would annoy me, I don´t like embossed Patterns on shields, surcoats etc, but in this case they are quite good, especially the Dragon ones. To avoid repeat designs along the shield line the embossed Patterns can be easily removed with a scalpel / razorblade. Two of the shields Need attaching but this is not a Problem, no glue being neccessary as they fit firmly onto the pegs.

esksg3

The figures are dressed in  a  range of styles, chainmail, padded surcoats and leather surcoats with studs.

357ksoi

2cp59fq

As I have siad, they  mix very well alongside the El Cid Figures from HaT and if you add a couple of the Strelets Normans on the march figures as commanders you can  create a really good looking shield wall.

This set and all the Strelets range can be found in Ebay trough our utility here.

Strelets M012 Military Order Warriors

After the First Crusade, Military orders was raised to protect the way to Holly Land, and the Holly Land itself. They were not only the biggest Christian force overseas, their power grow to become some of them in great forces in the continent, which some times caused
suspiciousness and problems with Kings and Feudal Lords.

There a good mix of clothes and weapons, including leather armours, coat of mail and different helmets and shields, which seems to be quite correct.

Shields are quite big for battle, even one of the figures have a Pavise, more common to see on archers or crossbowman.

The box haves 48 figures in 12 poses (4 equal sprue). Around a 1/3 of the figures are kneeling, so it’s a good set to depict a wall standing for a charge. Sculpture style is the usual of Strelets, sometimes not compatible with other makers, but detail is shape.

Figures haven’t flash, all the separate parts (just a few) fit quite well, although spears quality is not the best.

Step by Step – How to Make Medieval Pavise (1/72nd scale)

They are available in Sets like Miniart’s French Foot Soldiers with Rams or Zvezda’s French Infantry of the Hundred Years War..but they come unpainted, there´s too few of them, and I’m too lazy to spend hours straining my eyes to paint them ( they wouldn’t turn out well anyway ).

So..I came up with this;

1. First up..tools etc. wood-glue (not in pic) Scissors, sharp-blade, cocktail stick, Thin cardboard, wood-grain and shield pattern printouts. The wood-grain and shield patterns I got of the web..and re-sized…there are tons of them about but look out for copyright.

2. Slice the cocktail-stick in half (lengthways) and place on the glue smeared cardboard surface. It´s best to leave a bit of the cocktail-stick sticking out as you´ll see later.

3. Cut the shield pattern out leaving a decent edge all around and place as near as possible with the center of the shield over the cocktail-stick, which will form the central rib. You have to make sure that about half a cm at the top of the shield is stuck just to the cardboard. The little bit of the cocktail stick that is poking out the bottom can be used to align or push/pull the rib into position. Using your finger nails, push the paper pattern firmly onto the rib and the backing. Turn the whole thing over and apply the wood-grain pattern , making sure that the grain is properly aligned. You can check this by holding the shield up to the light.

4. Let everything dry and cut out. I´ve found, that to remove the sticking out bit of cocktail stick it´s best to use a sharp blade. The shield now looks like this;

5. With the edge of the nib from a marker ( I forgot to put it in the top pic!!! 😀 ) colour in the edges. I´ve used brown, but red would look nice as well 😀 (I certainly won´t get any work as a “Hand model” :-D)

6. Lay the shield along the marker pen and with your thumb press down. This gives the shield it´s final curved shape.

7. A stand can be made using a paper staple. Simply make a hole up behind the paper on the back of the Pavise, insert the staple (with a bit of PVA) glue) let it dry, bend it to the angle required and cut to length.

I hope this little how to is useful and obviously this can be used for making 28mm Pavise and probably would allow a lot more detail.

HaT El Cid Spanish Infantry (8176)

The El Cid range along with the corresponding Moors is in my opinion, one of HaT`s better ranges. Historically, they represent the period well and as the styles of dress,weapons were pretty generic across Europe at the time they can be recruited into a Norman army, and some of the light infantry as Saxons. They are made of soft plastic, well sculpted and there is very little flash, although, due to the softness of the plastic, removal of any flash can be a bit difficult, as it just bends away from the blade. Scalpel / modelling knives, although sharp are not really thin enough for the job so I recommend using a razor blade, which needs cutting to a point to enable you to get in all the small corners. I also advise using a razor blade when cutting this type of plastic during converting the figures.

The set consists of 96 figures, which comes on four sprue of 24, divided into heavy and light infantry types. There are 8 heavy infantry poses and 8 light infantry poses, which means a few of the poses are repeated 8 times within the set.

All 16 poses

Some of the light infantry after head transplants

 

The same, heavy infantry part of the set, painted up as their northern “neighbours”, the Normans. A pretty versatile set…useful as Normans, Iberians or early crusaders.

A couple of the heavy infantry painted as Normans and stood alongside the Strelets Norman infantry.

The one really big difference between the HaT and the Strelets figures, the HaT ones have their shields held to the left or right sides of their bodies….the Strelets ones have them held forward. When the two sets are combined this has an advantage. The Strelets figures can be used to form the front part of the shield wall, the Hat Figures can be used to form protection to the left and right flanks. Combine this with a few of the figures from the Strelets Norman infantry on the march set to fill out the rear and you have a pretty decent looking battle line. The bottom photo shows 21 figures on a 12cm by 8cm Impetus wargames sized base.

If you are looking for this set, try our utility to find it at best prices.

Fredericus-rex Medieval Trebuchet + Crew

This is a big Siege weapon, the kit measures H: 11cm´s W: 12cms L: 18cm´s, an impressive piece for any 1/72nd medieval army.

The kit, laser cut Balsa-wood and card comes with full and easy to follow instructions. The only part of the kit that is not wood or card is the sling which is made of resin. The kit can be painted with Acrylics (oils are recommended) and I just sloshed it on. This kit got 4 separate layers of paint added and absolutely no ill affects. The walls of the bucket (counterweight) being very thin, warped with the first layer of paint but went back to their original flat condition after a minute or so.

The kit fits together really easily, all that´s needed are scalpel, tweezers, and wood-glue.

TIPS
I recommend painting up ALL the parts before fitting, as when it´s put together it would be IMHO pretty fiddly to get into all the corners in order to paint them. The ladder. In the instructions it shows fitting the rungs in one go, they come on a sort of comb but it is impossible to get all the rungs lined up with the holes so I cut off every rung from the “sprue” and fitted them individually, lining them up by laying the ladder on it´s back and using two CD boxes pushed up from left and right. I dripped Revell’s liquid contact glue onto the ladder to “plastify” it and make it stronger. (I recommend doing this in a well aired place due to the fumes)
The Nylon thread provided is white..so I put it in a cup of hot water, added two old teabags and a teaspoon of instant coffee powder and left it for 1/2 an hour.

Here it is pictured with the trebuchet fron Minihistory

THE CREW

Sculpted by Markus Eckmann and available from Fredericus-rex, this set can be used for not just catapults and trebuchets but as hand-workers, labourers etc. I really like the style of these sculpts..all very natural looking (the one picking his nose 😀 ) and I hope Markus adds expands the range.

There are seven metal figures in the set, a “stretcher” for carrying a catapult ball (also included) and a sledge hammer (for banging in posts or knocking-out the firing pin on any throwing device they might be the crew of) Size wise they fit to virtually every available set of 1/72nd mediaevals.

Here they are with their trebuchet..also from Fredericus-rex.

and here with a mangonel from Zvezda

 

Zvezda Siege machines Kit 1 (8014)

If you collect 1/72nd medievals then this set is a must.

The Scorpion

This is useful not only for medievals but also for Ancients, particularly the Romans / Macedonian. Although such devices in this size did exist, the scorpion in the kit is still a big one in 1/72nd scale, and would have been a rarity rather than the norm. It fits alongside 1/72nd figures well but is also useful for 28mm. The kit is a bit more complicated than the Catapult but the instructions are clear and the parts fit together well. One thing that I would recommend…don´t use the bits of plastic meant to represent the rope meant ot wind the device up, but use sewing thread. Not only does it look more realistic but the “plastic” ropes that come with the kit are too short! Two bolts are supplied as ammunition but small balls can be used as these devices were used to launch stone “shot”. One minor complaint. The torsion ropes attached to the arms. Both of them are turned in one direction, namely clockwise (from top to bottom). In a real scorpion they would be wound up in opposing directions.

The onager.

Again, a useful bit of kit for ancients as well as medievals. The kit its self isn’t too complicated, the instructions are clear and it fits together easily. The wheels can be attached as free rolling or if wished simply left off, which was probably more likely when the device was put into position in a siege. The throwing arm can be set at any angle, from vertical (just fired) to horizontal (being loaded or about to be fired ) and everything between. The kit also contains two balls, which are useful to represent stone ammunition. Again, I suggest using thread or thin copper wire to add the tensioning ropes. As with the scorpion, the torsion rope at the bottom end of the throwing arm is incorrect. It is represented as being wound up in one direction along the whole of it´s length. If this was to be replicated in reality the arm would move to the right.

The mantlets.

Three are supplied, are easy to build and a good addition to the set.

Scorpion
Onager
Two of the three mantlets from the set
The Onager manned by the Siege machine crew from Fredericus-rex.

 

The set is available through our utility here.

 

Zvezda Medieval Peasant Army (Set 8059)

The peasants are revolting!!!! (And they smell a bit as well :-D) A very useful set which can be used to cover a wide range of the medieval period. The box art (front) claims them to be for the 13th to 14th (XIII _ XIV) centuries, the back for the 13th to the 15th centuries (XIII – XV) and the insert for the 16th century. All a bit confusing but the set fits well to any of these periods so no real problem. There are twelve main poses and if you use every figure in the set you will get a small army of 42 figures. Of the twelve poses, three are are “command” figures and come on a separate sprue. The “command” group consists of, one figure holding a sword, shield and wearing a cuirass (breastplate) ..all items a rarity among the peasantry so this figure has to be the “Boss”. The next “command” figure holds a burning torch and a Falchion, also a rare weapon for the peasantry but not unlikely. The last figure is one holding a ole..on the end of which a head has been stuck!!! Judging by the heads haircut it looks like it belonged to an upper-class person..most probably a knight

The set contains only one “odd” pose, that of a man running whilst brandishing a cudgel. Whilst the general pose is ok..the fact that he is looking down seems pretty odd.

Flash is very minimal although there is a bit of “spare” plastic in places but this is still a very useful and dynamic set.

All twelve poses that are supplied in the set.
The slinger pose converted to a staff slinger as is the head on a stick pose
The running cudgel man with leg swaps and one of the "advancing with pole-arm" converted to a crossbow man
man with flail (far right) converted to standard bearer and an "arrow catcher"
The archer pose (far right) converted using an arm from the Zvezda english 100yrs war infantry
A few other conversions (I´ve forgotten from which other poses)
A couple of fun conversions (Mules from Atlantic sets)

 
The set is available through out utility here.
 

Zvezda 8032 Medieval Heavy Bombard

This set contains a monster of a siege gun…what in real life would be a 600mm cannon or Bombard. The kit consists of a 7 man crew and comes with a hillock cast out of hard plastic onto which the gun can be placed and behind it the wooden buttresses that would have absorbed the Bombards massive recoil. There are some accessories, a hinged wooden shield, some wicker fencing and wooden panels which are intended to be added in front off and to either side of the Bombard to form a protective screen for the crew. Also included are two barrels, two sacks, two buckets, 3 cannon (Bombard) balls, a big wooden hammer and a ramrod.

The crew are not really a crew interacting with the gun as such..they appear to be getting on with moving things about in the main except one who is holding the ram and the ” gunner” who is giving out orders, but they fit well with their “monster” cannon.

The only complaint I can come up with is the defensive fence pieces. The moveable shield is fine but it is when the others are attached to the mound. The wooden mantelets seem to “perch” on the mound and the wicker fences reach out into nothing, leaving a huge space underneath.

To overcome this, I glued the mound onto a slightly bigger base and built the side around it up with layers of sand and wood-glue mix until there was enough area to place the fences with a realistic amount of space and not have them hanging in space.

The set is available through our utility at Ebay.

1/72 – Airfix 01720 – Robin hood

No longer released by Airfix, but by HaT, this has to be one of the most useful 1/72nd sets of medieval figures going.

It can be used to create not only Robins merry men but a revolting peasant army, generic levy troops, men operating siege equipment or just peasants standing about to fill, say a jousting scene.

The original plastic used by Airfix was a bit harder than that used by HaT. Although I have none in my collection (the figures pictured are all original Airfix products) I have seen the new HaT reproduction figures and the plastic used seems to leave a lot more flash than their 30 plus year old counterparts. This could also be down to the mould being old, but the softer plastic figures are certainly better than none, and as the original Airfix ones age, they can suffer from “plastic rot”..the plastic becoming brittle.

The original set still is easy to found, take a look here.
Hät’s new one is less abundant, but still available.

Each of the individual figures in the set, without repeats

And now…a couple of conversions! 😀

Conversions of the same figure headswops and new weapons for the 1st two. The one on the far right has had an arm from the Italeri´s english knights and archers set added, hood made from toilet paper, bow, a bent piece of wire.
Another 3 conversions of the same figure. Swap the head and that would make 6 new poses.
With a bit or arm twisting, swapping of weapons for pins as spears you can create more variety.
far left, a gunner firing a cannon, middle, head-swap and halberd from a Zvezda set, far right head-swap and a bit of green stuff (putty) and another gunner is created.


 

Italeri medieval Tournament / Challenge

These are among my favourite 1/72nd medieval sets. The sculpting is top class The range of figures and the extras included in the set portray a day out at the joust without any additions from other sets.

The standing figures.

I really can´t find anything to fault with them. The multi part knights fit together exceptionally well with no trace of any joins. The embossed designs are finely done as are the folds in the clothes and the armour.

The Lords and ladies
The knights. The one on the far left hasn't lost the end of any sort of weapon. It is a basic pole arm without any sort of point.
The Heralds, a gaurd and a referee
As I said..the sculpting detail is top class...the faces are wonderful

The mounted Knights.

The one thing that I noticed as I was painting them…..the lances can only be attached so that they end up facing outwards to the right. This is of course wrong as they should point to the left across the horses neck, on the shield side of the knight and across the dividing wall towards the opponent.

This can be altered by cutting the knight away from his seat and turning the body but as I noticed it, it was too late.

Still, they are lovely sculpts with some great details.

The four horsemen. The Cheques are lightly moulded onto the horses which makes painting them easier.
Some of the detail is very small but very well done

The Extras

With the medieval Tournament set you get a set of 3 wooden walls to separate the knights when they are jousting and a observers stand.

The Medieval Challenge set comes with a ruined church, a set of fences, a Quintain, some standards and water-slide transfers. I only used the Ruin and the fences.

The lords and ladies "under cover"
I've left the roof unglued so the figures can be removed. For a bit of extra colour I've added a tapestry of a hunting scene.
The fences and wooden walls. I´ve altered the fences so that they form a continuous stretch of fencing rather than the "S" form
The abandoned church. Even here the sculpting is very well done. The stonework is excellent

And finally, all of the bits together!!

If you still haven’t this set, there are two ways to get these beautiful figures. The Italeri 6108 Medieval Tournament which also comes with sets of figures for the 100 Years’ War, and the Italeri 6109 Medieval Challenge, which only comes with the Tournament elements, without 100 Years’ war sets.

Zvezda 1/72 8027 – Medieval Field Powder Artillery

This is a very nice set…a combination of figure painting and a bit of model construction. The set contains 10 figures, of which only two are repeats, the cannonier firing the guns., 2 cannons, a horse team and sacks, buckets, rams and ammunition boxes.

All the poses are natural and fit perfectly to the artillery pieces.

The guns themselves
Each gun fits together perfectly…no glueing required whatsoever. I advise building each gun before painting. This makes painting them a bit more complicated than painting each section individually but it will save a lot of annoyance when putting the parts together and seeing your paintwork rub off!! The wheels can be painted seperately and fitted last. Here I advise a prefit. The holes in the wheels fit very tightly on the axles..and it may be necessary to open them up a bit with the tip of a toothpick. When you finally fit them, add a thin film of vaseline to the axle..it helps to ease them on.

Veuglaire. A chamber loaded piece. It was aimed through use of the bracket, raising or lowering the barrel by putting a pin through the bracket, the rear end of the barrel would then sit on this pin.
Serpentine. It got it´s name from the long barrel (snake like) This is also a chamber loaded piece, the aiming is, like the veuglair achieved by means of the (in this case) double bracket. Like the veuglaire, the barrel of this model can actually be elevated or depressed!!
Ribauldequin. The machine gun of the period. A multi barreled weapon, this would be used in rows on the battlefield or placed in gateways to concentrate the effct of all the barrels being fired in one go. This model has 8 barrels, a shield to protect the crew and spears at the front..used to keep off attackers.

Now on to the rest of the set,

The crews…I have added the crews to the guns…I won´t make any comment about them, apart from they are all historically correct and a real joy, there are enough in the set to service every weapon!! 😀

All figures and weapons painted with acrylics. Basework, Mixture from sand and woodglue, with natural and synthetic decoration.

 

You can buy this Zvezda set here.

1/72 Orion 72039 Hussite War Wagon And Command

Orion 72039 Hussite War Wagon And Command

Another tiny review for one of the latest released set, this time the Orion Hussite War Wagon and Command, 72039 set.
First of all I must said than figures in this set have a high quality sculpture, and are a must be in any Hussite or Medieval army in our scale, but the set have other odds which don’t glad to me. The most important the lack of instructions to built the wagon, which haves around 35 parts, and just a one angle picture in the box’s back will be your only help.

Orion Hussite War Wagon built.

Hussite Wagons were covered time ago by MiniArt, but this new wagon from Orion have some better features, and also another odd, which is size. Figures are completely covered by the wagon wall, while this probably is more accurate it means than the figures you will be painting a couple of hours will be almost hidden. The best of the wagon is the wooden pattern, clearly visible in all pieces.

Comparative between Orion Hussite War Wagon and MiniArt's ones.

Another odd of the set is that Orion don’t managed new horses for this great figures, they just re-release one sprue of horses used in previous sets, which we must say are too small for the riders, as pictures show. I replaced them by some Italei horses, but just for the pictures, i don’t know which will be the definitive horses if i paint this set.

Orion horses aren't the best of this set.

Figures of the set depict three own named historic personages plus three figures including one horse standart and one driver for the wagon. The historic personages are Jan Hus, Jan Ziska and Prokop the Great.

Jan Hus (1369 – 6 July 1415) is who named the Hussites, he is the first actual Church reformer, prior to Luther or Calvin. Their defense and rebellion against Roman Catholics became known as the Hussite Wars.He died burned at the stake for heresy, something very common in that time.

The left figure represent Jan Hus.

Jan Ziska (1360–1424) was an Hussite Leader, probably the famous ones and is one of the four general in history who never was defeated. One of his innovations were the War Wagons which are a tank precursor 5 hundred years before. I recommend the lecture of the Wiki article, as he was a really impressive and important General who improved and changed the medieval warfare forever.

Prokop the Great (1380 – 1434) Another Hussite Command, who was the most prominent leader of the latter Hussite Wars.

Prokop in the center, Jan Ziska on right.

The last feature remarkable of the set are the couple of ox, which are not common in our hobby. MiniArt’s wagon use horses. Take care that real War Wagons were capable to acommodate 15 or 20 men, which are impossible with these two representations.

You can buy the set here.

1/72 RedBox RB72039 Hussite Infantry

1/72 RedBox RB72039 Hussite Infantry

Another of the newly released sets from RedBox. This one was released prior to last entry for the War of the Roses, and has been completely reviewed at PSR site, don’t miss it.

My figures haven’t the same plastic colour than the ones in PSR site, so they must be a second series, and once againg they show some less flash than in PSR, although more that the Men at Arms and retinue set.

This time you get 36 figures in 12 poses, plus 3 shields in three equals sprue.
One of the problem with the sprue are some of the weapons, is hard to know where the sprue ends and the weapon begin :D, so take care of this.
Sculpture is quite good and shields have been decorated in relieve so a hand painted scheme is affordable.
Another problem are gain mould marks, which cross some faces by the middle.

The hussite infantry has been covered previously for some other manufacturers, for comparission i took some pictures close to the MiniArt 72010 Hussites and the Orion 72019 Medieval Siege Troops which is not marked as Hussite but have a lot of hand gunners than can be used so.

As you can see in the pictures the three sets are quite compatible, so a great variation can be achieved to cover the subject. Only one of the three sets, the MiniArt ones, comes with two hussite wagons, although recently Orion have released a set which haves some nice figures and one hussite wagon.
I also included two Zvezda figures to show they are all quite compatible again. Medieval range seem to be a lucky ones, we have four manufacturers here and all figures are compatible, this not ever happen.

If i must choose one of the sets as the best, i can’t. All have odds and advantages. The MiniArt haves the two wagon, but at least my set, is plenty full of flash and mould problems, more than the RedBox ones. The Orion set have some very nice sculpted figures, but also tons of flahs, no wagon and not all the figures can be taken as Hussite infantry. So probably the best option is take the three. 😀
An excellent example of the MiniaArt figures can be found at mate Paul’s blog.

As the War of the Roses set this one shows the improvement made by RedBox, and i’m excited about the next release from this brand. It could be good if they reworked all the sets made for the Boxer’s Rebellion. A good subject very bad covered by their previous sets, or the Korean medieval army, also covered by their previous works.

If you want to take this set now, take a look here.

1/72 RedBox RB72040 Men At Arms and Retinue

1/72 RedBox RB72040 Men At Arms and Retinue

Is the first time i brought a RedBox set, after see the quality improvement they have done with their new medieval range,and i think they deserve this tiny review.
Set contains 30 figures in 10 poses, spread in 3 equals sprue.

In fact quality of the sculpture is far away from previous RedBox’s set, so this one must be in any medieval army in 1/72 scale. All the poses looks pretty well, and the amount of flash in my set is less than the showed at PSR site (i’m lucky). They still have some mould problems, as many of the figures are crossed by mould marks, specially faces, what is an important odd in paint process. Mould marks are harder to remove than flash, you will probably disfigure all the faces if try it.
The standard bearer is probably the worst figure, not by the figure itself, but the standard is quite usefulness, and hard to remove from the sprue. Better will be thinking in replace it for a self made flag, which is not so hard. The flag is so thick than figure can’t stand up by itself 🙂

Although it can’t be appreciated in pictures another fault is the figure taking an arrow from the ground, the arrow is almost so thick as his arm.

I’m not an expert in medieval period but all the figures looks correct to me. They look what they are, medieval knight and men at arms, ready to fight. The several archer figures contribute to the sensation of they are British men.

Figures have a size totally compatible with the high quality Zvezda’s range, so if you have a medieval army composed with the Zvezda’s set, this can be a good addition.

This one pass to the workbench, which is so huge at this moment than i’m not sure if they will be painted any time, as my medieval project is currently stopped.

Despite all the odds we are very happy to see the great quality improvement done by RedBox, we expect all the forthcoming releases will be in the same or greater quality, so we almost can say a “new brand” has born and we will be happy to purchase and work with their sets.

Don’t wait to get it, take a look here and choose the cheapest option.

Accurate 7207 Hundred Years War Knights Of France

Accurate 7207 Hundred Years War Knights Of France

A nice and well detailed set, i have completed during these days my medieval collection with some sets from MiniArt, Zvezda and one from Orion.
Zvezda models are a bit bigger than rest, the major problem with MiniArt ones, wich are the smallest, and i’m gladded with Orion set, although it haves a bit of flash, sign of a bad mould, their sculpture is clear and nice, and there are some interesting poses.

I was looking some pictures from Osprey books, to take a idea about how to paint this, but after some tries, i decide to paint it free, as real shields and clothes for this period, have a lot of detail not easy to paint.
I still need a solution for shields, as they are flat as this moment. Zvezda sets have all the heraldry in relieve, so it will be easier to paint than this. We will see.