Tag Archives: Zvezda

1/72 – UM (352) + S-Model (720005) – (What If) 38(t) PanzerWerfer 21cm

(What If) 38(t) PanzerWerfer 21cm

Any resemblance to reality it’s purely coincidental. Just for fun a “what if” joining a 38(t) Hetzer hull by UM with a Nebelwerfer 21cm by S-Model.
Figure by Zvezda (Elite Troops 1941 – 1943).

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Art Composition

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UM 352 Early Hetzer version can be found here. S-Model – 720005 – Nebelwerfer 42 210mm can be found here. Figure are from the Zvezda 6180 – German Elite Troops 1941 – 1943

1/72 Zvezda – 5003 – RT-2PM TOPOL / SS-25 SICKLE “The last argument”

A little about machine:

The RT-2PM Topol (Russian: РТ-2ПМ Тополь (“Poplar”); NATO reporting name SS-25 Sickle; GRAU designation: 15Ж58 (“15Zh58”);  is a mobile intercontinental ballistic missile designed in the Soviet Union and in service with Russia’s Strategic Missile Troops.

The three stage solid propellant RT-2PM Topol is an improved mobile ICBM which replaced earlier outdated missile complexes. It emerged from the same line of development as mobile missiles such as the RT-21 Temp 2S and the RSD-10 Pioneer, and was deployed as a replacement for the widely deployed UR-100. The United States considered developing their own road-mobile ICBM called the Midgetman, but the program was canceled with the end of the Cold War.

Development of the RT-2PM was approved on July 19, 1977 and carried out by the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology headed by A. D. Nadiradze. Flight tests were conducted on the Plesetsk test site from February through December 1985. The main problem that had to be overcome during this period was the development of battle management system. After the first test series was successfully conducted in April 1985, with the first regiment with Topol missiles put on alert in July 1985. Throughout this time work continued on improving the battle management system. The test missile firings were finally completed in December 1987. The first regiment of “Topol” missiles employing a modernized mobile command center (in the area of Irkutsk) were put on alert on May 27, 1988. After Nadiradze’s death in 1988 Boris N. Lapygin continued his work on the Topol missile.

About kit:

Great quality. Quality of this kit can be placed in series with some well-known Chinese producers. Easy going but long time. Many pieces. Good quality rubber protectors. This “Leviathan” compared to the other models will look eerily huge.

 

About painting:

Customer wanted to get this model without camouflage. So I used the classic Soviet military color “4BO”. But container of the rocket and machine itself painted different shades of green. To make easy variety of colors rocket  container was painted in khaki. Just like the customer wanted the model with abundant wethernig, but since these machines (unlike other Soviet military) is always kept clean and tidy, I just soiled lower part of machine. The rest of the machines were used only drips of rain and a little dust.

Also to add some interesting machine was painted using color modulation technology.

As usual, everything was painted with artistic acrylic, oil and MIG pigments.

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Find this model at best prices in Ebay here.
 

(NEW) TOPOL SS-25 “SICKLE” 1:72 ZVEZDA – 5003 – InBox Review

TOPOL SS-25 “”SICKLE  Russian Ballistic missile launcher.

The RT-2PM Topol (Russian: РТ-2ПМ Тополь (“Poplar”); NATO reporting name SS-25 Sickle; GRAU designation: 15Ж58 (“15Zh58”); other designations: RS-12M Topol)[3] is a mobile intercontinental ballistic missile designed in the Soviet Union and in service with Russia’s Strategic Rocket Forces.

The three stage solid propellant RT-2PM Topol is an improved mobile ICBM which replaced earlier outdated missile complexes. It emerged from the same line of development as mobile missiles such as the RT-21 Temp 2S and the RSD-10 Pioneer, and was deployed as a replacement for the widely deployed UR-100. The United States considered developing their own road-mobile ICBM called the Midgetman, but the program was canceled with the end of the Cold War.

Development of the RT-2PM was approved on July 19, 1977 and carried out by the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology headed by A. D. Nadiradze. Flight tests were conducted on the Plesetsk test site from February through December 1985. The main problem that had to be overcome during this period was the development of battle management system. After the first test series was successfully conducted in April 1985, with the first regiment with Topol missiles put on alert in July 1985. Throughout this time work continued on improving the battle management system. The test missile firings were finally completed in December 1987. The first regiment of “Topol” missiles employing a modernized mobile command center (in the area of Irkutsk) were put on alert on May 27, 1988. After Nadiradze’s death in 1988 Boris N. Lapygin continued his work on the Topol missile.

A little bit about the box contents and quality.

The box itself is very large. As if 35 scale. Crazy amount of parts for 72 scale (309). Great quality. No burr and sink marks. Detailing is very good. Pleased even the presence of cables, molded integral detail. This will simplify the addition model details. The model has two versions of the assembly in the stowed position and launch.

Very nice wheels. On the photos I tried to show in more detail some interesting details. The only pity is that the box has only container but does not have the rocket missiles. It would be very epic assemble the model at the time of its launch, with clouds of smoke from the wool))))))

As a result, we can say that the model came out great. I hope the company “ZVEZDA”  continue the series of strategic and tactical systems of the Soviet Union: REDUT, ISCANDER…

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Model can be found in Ebay at good prices, take a look here.

 

 

Zvezda – 5011 – IS-2 – Finished Model

This was my longest built to date. After the initial paint, I waited a couple of days, then applied the first oil wash in darker tones. I sealed it with Vallejo’s flat varnish, then added more oil colors, this time mixed to represent the dusted areas. Another coat of varnish, and then the final grease spots and other small details. For the first time I used Mig Jimenez Abteilung 502 oil colors, and I must say they are great.

The tracks were painted with Vallejo German Camo Black Brown, which is the best color in their range for bare metal. Some oil washes for the dust, then pigments and this is it. The raised surfaces on the tracks, as well as the contact surfaces of the road-wheels were “polished” with AK Dark Steel pigment, a GREAT product, also designed by Mig Jimenez. The shovel and cables were painted separately and added at the very end.

It’s time to work on the diorama!

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Zvezda – 5011 – IS-2 – Base Coat

After the construction, I sprayed the model with Vallejo white acrylic primer (polyurethane), but I ended up with a grainy surface and not much adherence to the model. So I had to remove it and apply a new coat of Tamiya white primer from a can. Is lacquer based and worked better as it leaves a very smooth and hard surface.

After the primer, I covered the whole tank with Vallejo Russian Green and applied a little color modulation on more exposed areas. The white stripes and the turret numbers are hand brushed as it were in reality.

Next, I will apply an yellow oil filter to lighten up the green, and the rest of the weathering techniques. _MG_8042-006 _MG_8045-004 _MG_8046-003 _MG_8047-002 _MG_8048-001 _MG_8043-005

 

Zvezda – 5011 – IS-2 – Construction Done

First of all, I will say that this is the my favorite WW2 tank: impressive, efficient and “sexy”. It was Soviet Union’s breakthrough after the KV tank family, a predecessor and the starting point of all modern Russian heavy tanks.

After the turret construction I started to work on the upper hull, by removing the original plastic fenders and replacing them with ones made from beer can foils. There is a photo-etched set from Part for the old PST and Italieri kits, but it doesn’t provide the fenders. The advantage of working with thin aluminium foils is that you can easily bend it; my reference pictures showed some very battered tanks, and all of them had bend, broken or missing parts of the fenders.

The joining lines on the nose of the tank are way too sharp and pronounced, so I had to sand it to gave a more rounded appearance. I then brushed and stippled a thin layer of Mr. Surfacer 1000 to obtain a rough casting texture, just like for the turret.

Next were the air intakes and their mesh screens. Zvezda offers a quite acceptable plastic replica, even better looking the the ones from Part’s set, which are nothing but some holes drilled into a brass plate. A Lipton tea bag proved again to be a great substitute, and I will definitely use it in my future builds.

I than added the MasterClub hexagonal bolts, after shaving off the original ones. I’ve described the whole process here. The lifting rings and other few small but time consuming details were next. The gun travel lock came from the Italieri kit, as it has superior details. The towing cables are from Eureka XXL and were a great addition.

One of the most difficult challenge was to make the supports of the side barrels. I used the main supporting ribs from Part (again, shortened with few millimeters), and glued can foil strips on top.

After that I moved to the lower hull, by adding the ammo loading hatch, which was missing. The tracks are very easy to work with, but unfortunately you can’t obtain a proper amount of track sag, or at least I couldn’t. The tracks are not attached permanently, for an easy painting, and I think is better to assemble them by gluing the ends and shave off the mounting lugs. This way you can test the sag and the tracks can easily be removed for painting (for this, the outer half of the road wheels and sprockets shouldn’t be glued permanently).

All in all, this is a good kit, but with a few shortcomings. I could add some more about other details, but I will let the photos speak for themselves. Most important, this kit provides a good foundation for those obsessed with details, like myself.

_MG_7948-001 _MG_7949-002 _MG_7950-003 _MG_7951-004 _MG_7953-006 _MG_7954-007 _MG_7955-008 _MG_7957-010 _MG_7959-012 _MG_7960-013 _MG_7962-015 A photo with the resin base, somewhere on the outskirts of Berlin, spring 1945 🙂_MG_7961-014

OKB Grigorov resin tracks

I received recently two sets of probably the best aftermarket resin tracks currently available. They are produced by OKB Grigorov from Bulgaria and released this year, if I’m correct. I have a Panzer IV Ausf. G from Dragon (1/72) and I wanted a pair of Winterketten under its road-wheels and nothing will do better than this set from OKB Grigorov. I also bough a set of early tracks for Panther, with Zvezda’s Ausf. D on my mind. Details on both these sets are breathtaking; the Panther tracks have hollow guide horns, and, to my knowledge, this was never achieved so far in Braille scale. OKB Grigorov supplies other superb track sets, and I will definitely buy more: Panzer III/IV (also with hollow guide horns), Ostketten, Panther late tracks, T34 etc.

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Panther early tracks (the black ones are from Zvezda):

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The Winterketten:

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More than highly recommended!

Zvezda – 5011 – IS-2 – MasterClub bolts

I wanted to improve the bolts for my IS-2 from Zvezda (1/72), as the ones on the real tank are hexagonal, not round. So I’ve searched the web and came across this Russian company called MasterClub which had exactly what I needed: 0.5 mm hexagonal bolts “on a turn key basis”. I think there is not a single kind of bolts and nuts this company doesn’t supply. For under 10 EUR via eBay (plus transport) I got myself 180 tiny little bolts.

The bag:

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The bolts:

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I made the first attempt on the rear engine access plate. Just drilled the holes and inserted the bolts, and at the end I added a small drop of superglue on the inside face. The original plastic pull rings (which look quite good) were replaced also. Zvezda did a terrific job with those weld seams around the hinges.

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A closeup, to see the hexagonal shape of the bolt.

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I think these bolts really improve the look of a model, especially in larger scales, where you can actually see the difference. Highly recommended!

Zvezda – 5011 – IS-2 – Turret Construction Review

I started the construction of this kit with the intention to build an IS-2 that took part in the battle for Berlin. I plan to place it in a small diorama at the end.

During my research I’ve learned that IS-2 turrets were made by three different factories: UZTM, Hammer & Sickle and Factory no. 200. I opted for a Factory 200 turret, as the tank I want to build seems to have all its trademarks. Among these, some are quite noticeable: low casting seam, smooth commander’s cupola, big numbers on the back – usually one letter and a digit above a group of three digits.

Unfortunately, Zvezda provides a muzzle brake that is too short, so I had to buy an aftermarket one from Aber, which is far from being perfect. I had to rework the muzzle brake, as it lacks all of its casting marks and contours.

The rain guard above gun mantlet lacks the hinged front section so I had to improvise one. I added pistol ports and the caps of the gun trunnions by cutting small styrene discs. I thought the Mk. IV visors were too small so I replaced them with new ones made from scraps.

I added grab handles and textured the surface with Mr. Surfacer 1000. An old Italieri IS-2 provided a nice option for the commander’s cupola hatch, and has some interior details. Though remained closed, I decided to stick with Zvezda’s loader’s hatch, as I think it has very nice details. There are two pairs of bolts on this hatch that must be shaved off and replaced with holes with the same diameter.

The round mobile part of the 7.62 mm DT machine gun was taken from Italieri IS-2, as Zvezda’s seemed a little too flat compared to the real thing. I replaced the barrel with a syringe needle and added few bolts and other small details. The casting numbers are made from brass wire and simply glued into place.

muzzle brake

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1/72 IS-2 Comparison: Zvezda, Italieri and PST

This is my all-time favorite tank and I wanted to build it for a long time; I already had Italieri and PST kits and I was ready for a kitbash. However, when I heard Zvezda will release its own version (a snap fit), and knowing the quality of its earlier releases (T34, Tiger I and Panther Ausf D), I decided to wait. And the wait was worthwhile. This is not a comprehensive review, just a few shots with the main parts (I didn’t removed the flash on any part, just detached it from the sprues).

The boxes:

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The upper hull (Zvezda on the left, Italieri in the middle, and PST on the right). Italieri’s hull is a little bit short, both Zvezda and PST seem to have the right proportions, Zvezda has the nicest details of all:

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Lower hulls (same order). I took an extra shot with Zvezda’s lower hull, looks like Dragon style, with superb details :

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Tracks:

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Road-wheels:

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Wheel drives:

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Gun barrels. I added the metal Aber barrel just for comparison. I don’t know if I’m right, but I think this is Zvezda’s only soft spot: the gun muzzle brake is maybe a little too short.

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The turrets. Italieri is the only one with a very nice cast texture (present on the hull also). All Zvezda hatches are closed (maybe another minus).

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General shots with Zvezda kit sprues. The DSzK 12.7mm machine gun has amazing details, and I think is the best plastic replica in 1/72.

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I think the conclusion is obvious: Zvezda IS-2 is the best on the 1/72 market today.
All the models showed here can be found through our utility in Ebay.

Zvezda 1/72 Panther Ausf D

Ever since I build Zvezda’s excellent T-34 snap kit, I’ve been looking forward for their next releases in 1/72 scale: a Panther Ausf D and an IS-2. While the IS-2 launching was postponed several times, the Panther finally arrived in late 2012. Dragon released its own Panther Ausf D in 2012, marketed also as “early”, but it seems it is a mix of early and late Ausf D features. Though Dragon offers a really nice and highly detailed kit, it seems Zvezda’s Panther is a more accurate early D version. And, much more cheaper!

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Inside the box there are two sand coloured sprues with kit parts, a separate black sprue with the tracks, a decal sheet and instructions. IMG_6482-004 IMG_6486-006

All hatches are closed, so I’m sure some modelers will complain, but personally I don’t mind. Instead, I welcome a few really nice touches, as the weld seams, separate OVM tools and tow cables, and very good molded gun so there will be no need for an after-market one.

The track runs are one-piece with grooves molded-in that will help bending the tracks around the idlers and driver wheels. Again, the details on the tracks is very good.

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The kit doesn’t provide the mesh screens for the engine deck, but this can be solved with a photo-etched set.

Decals are well printed and provide two marking options – both from the battle of Kursk.

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Instructions are clear and concise and are offered both in Russian and English.

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In conclusion, this is a very good and accurate kit. It should be recommended also for its highly competitive price. I will probably buy a PE set from Part and with other few minor improvements I’m sure it will turn out into a fine looking model.

Zvezda Siege machines Kit 1 (8014)

If you collect 1/72nd medievals then this set is a must.

The Scorpion

This is useful not only for medievals but also for Ancients, particularly the Romans / Macedonian. Although such devices in this size did exist, the scorpion in the kit is still a big one in 1/72nd scale, and would have been a rarity rather than the norm. It fits alongside 1/72nd figures well but is also useful for 28mm. The kit is a bit more complicated than the Catapult but the instructions are clear and the parts fit together well. One thing that I would recommend…don´t use the bits of plastic meant to represent the rope meant ot wind the device up, but use sewing thread. Not only does it look more realistic but the “plastic” ropes that come with the kit are too short! Two bolts are supplied as ammunition but small balls can be used as these devices were used to launch stone “shot”. One minor complaint. The torsion ropes attached to the arms. Both of them are turned in one direction, namely clockwise (from top to bottom). In a real scorpion they would be wound up in opposing directions.

The onager.

Again, a useful bit of kit for ancients as well as medievals. The kit its self isn’t too complicated, the instructions are clear and it fits together easily. The wheels can be attached as free rolling or if wished simply left off, which was probably more likely when the device was put into position in a siege. The throwing arm can be set at any angle, from vertical (just fired) to horizontal (being loaded or about to be fired ) and everything between. The kit also contains two balls, which are useful to represent stone ammunition. Again, I suggest using thread or thin copper wire to add the tensioning ropes. As with the scorpion, the torsion rope at the bottom end of the throwing arm is incorrect. It is represented as being wound up in one direction along the whole of it´s length. If this was to be replicated in reality the arm would move to the right.

The mantlets.

Three are supplied, are easy to build and a good addition to the set.

Scorpion
Onager
Two of the three mantlets from the set
The Onager manned by the Siege machine crew from Fredericus-rex.

 

The set is available through our utility here.

 

Zvezda Medieval Peasant Army (Set 8059)

The peasants are revolting!!!! (And they smell a bit as well :-D) A very useful set which can be used to cover a wide range of the medieval period. The box art (front) claims them to be for the 13th to 14th (XIII _ XIV) centuries, the back for the 13th to the 15th centuries (XIII – XV) and the insert for the 16th century. All a bit confusing but the set fits well to any of these periods so no real problem. There are twelve main poses and if you use every figure in the set you will get a small army of 42 figures. Of the twelve poses, three are are “command” figures and come on a separate sprue. The “command” group consists of, one figure holding a sword, shield and wearing a cuirass (breastplate) ..all items a rarity among the peasantry so this figure has to be the “Boss”. The next “command” figure holds a burning torch and a Falchion, also a rare weapon for the peasantry but not unlikely. The last figure is one holding a ole..on the end of which a head has been stuck!!! Judging by the heads haircut it looks like it belonged to an upper-class person..most probably a knight

The set contains only one “odd” pose, that of a man running whilst brandishing a cudgel. Whilst the general pose is ok..the fact that he is looking down seems pretty odd.

Flash is very minimal although there is a bit of “spare” plastic in places but this is still a very useful and dynamic set.

All twelve poses that are supplied in the set.
The slinger pose converted to a staff slinger as is the head on a stick pose
The running cudgel man with leg swaps and one of the "advancing with pole-arm" converted to a crossbow man
man with flail (far right) converted to standard bearer and an "arrow catcher"
The archer pose (far right) converted using an arm from the Zvezda english 100yrs war infantry
A few other conversions (I´ve forgotten from which other poses)
A couple of fun conversions (Mules from Atlantic sets)

 
The set is available through out utility here.
 

Zvezda WWII German Paratroops 6136 1/72

Hello all,

I swore I would never fall for the Zvezda con of 4 figures for £3 but I have! So far there are not really one great set of Fallschirmjäger, all have various problems like missing magazines, size issues to barrels being pointed into the ground (I still love that old ESCI set though).

This set contains four multi part figures that fit well together that only requires a little filler. No flash to speak of and hardly any mould lines to combat. It is such a shame that this isn’t a larger set and no signs of expanding it.

It comes with a larger base or movement tray as I think it is called in the war gaming world, or these individual bases. The best thing for me is the fact that they come not attached to any base’s because the normal Zvezda plastic is Farley hard to remove and I fear for me fingers with that blade!

The figures appear to be from the early half of the war which makes a change from the late Normandy/Italian campaigns. I decided to try and steer away from the Luftwaffe blue which always spark the argument that they never jumped in it and used the more traditional field grey trousers and helmet. I can see their point about camouflage but the other side is the blue does look good.

I want to try and paint some figures from the Operation “Mercury” Crete landings. Out came the Osprey men-at-arms book which is always a good fall back when some one moans about the wrong colour shoelaces or whatever, you just say I copied straight from the book!

I started by painting the jump smock a light grey with a light wash of Vallejo grey green. Then the helmet and trousers a field grey colour. Then looking at the book it showed them with sand coloured helmets so out came the Iraqi sand. I was hoping to get away without painting camo smocks but they do look better with a splash of colour. I could not resist at least one bit of Luftwaffe blue to creep in so one helmet got the treatment.

The base’s are already built for these blokes and are primed ready to be painted, so in time they will be peering around corners wait for the defenders of Crete to return fire. All in all I would say the Zvezda figure sets are getting better the the first offering.

The set is available through our Ebay utility here.

 

Zvezda 6158 German heavy anti-aircraft gun FLAK 36/37 1/72.

Hello all,

Work has been still mad, but now my boss has decided to give me a rest and banned working weekends so the I can now pick up the brushes again.

I was looking in the local model shop at the Italeri and Zvezda 88’s and on price the Zvezda won hands down. At nearly half the price and twice as many parts I would have been mad not to try one. The crew is not as good as the Italeri’s set and not nearly as many either.

The FLAK 36/37 must have been a can opener it is massive. I had no idea the size of it until I put it next to some figures. Who ever thought of using this as an anti tank gun was an evil genesis. At 16,200 yards the range and punch of this beast must have been terrifying for any allied tanker.

Back to the kit, it consists of 45 parts including 4 crew, not quite enough to serve it but a start. It requires no glue, or so it say’s but in certain parts like the gun mantel it would be recommended. All the parts fitted well and it only took about half and hour to build from start to finish. I really enjoyed this build due to the hangover that I was suffering from not having to work this weekend. I was glad of the option of not having to build it on the base, you have the choice of using the separate plates.

The crew will be built at a later date because I am looking at which dio base to build. I am leaning to using it in an anti aircraft roll. With it’s barrel poking menacingly into the air I think it looks more dramatic. To be fair I would look at buying a second one for the anti tank role in the north Africa desert, but the crew of the Italeri might just swing it for that. I might have to look at getting some of the SHQ spare ammo case’s and shells to have lying around the dio, I do not know why manufactures do not put more of these in kit is beyond me!!! If HaT can do it than so can the other’s. There new crew sets have several bits and bobs to have knocking around the gun pit. So come on then Zvezda and the like take note!

The set is available through our utility here.

Zvezda 8032 Medieval Heavy Bombard

This set contains a monster of a siege gun…what in real life would be a 600mm cannon or Bombard. The kit consists of a 7 man crew and comes with a hillock cast out of hard plastic onto which the gun can be placed and behind it the wooden buttresses that would have absorbed the Bombards massive recoil. There are some accessories, a hinged wooden shield, some wicker fencing and wooden panels which are intended to be added in front off and to either side of the Bombard to form a protective screen for the crew. Also included are two barrels, two sacks, two buckets, 3 cannon (Bombard) balls, a big wooden hammer and a ramrod.

The crew are not really a crew interacting with the gun as such..they appear to be getting on with moving things about in the main except one who is holding the ram and the ” gunner” who is giving out orders, but they fit well with their “monster” cannon.

The only complaint I can come up with is the defensive fence pieces. The moveable shield is fine but it is when the others are attached to the mound. The wooden mantelets seem to “perch” on the mound and the wicker fences reach out into nothing, leaving a huge space underneath.

To overcome this, I glued the mound onto a slightly bigger base and built the side around it up with layers of sand and wood-glue mix until there was enough area to place the fences with a realistic amount of space and not have them hanging in space.

The set is available through our utility at Ebay.

Zvezda WWII Soviet naval infanty 1/72 (6146).

Hello all,

I would like to start by wishing everyone a happy new year and then say thanks for being invited to post on this great blog with people who can paint a hell of a lot better than me! I just hope my stuff is up to standard, I can get away with my shoddy work on my own blog.

I do not normally buy the Zvezda art of tactics infantry sets out of principle. Paying for only four plastic soldiers nearly the same price for a full set is a bit of a con (however good they are). The gun sets are great value for money and have a few gem’s there.I had to make an exception with this set though because I have a soft spot for unusual sets and these fit the bill. I know Pegasus have done a set of Soviet naval infantry but not in what appears to be summer dress.

The figures are up to the normal Zvezda high quality by using multi part figures to give a good three dimensional look to them. The poses are great especially the bloke kneeing down throwing the grenade, a great touch I think.There is a good level of detail on the figures like the ammo belts, I decided not to try and paint every round on every belt because I would still be there now!

The only down sides to these lads are the fact that they do not have the scarf thingy (forgive me but I was in the army not the navy) like the Pegasus set have.This could be sorted out with a bit of “green stuff” but I am not too sure if it would have been worn in combat, if anyone knows different please, please let us know.

The other problem was the fit of the parts. It say’s on the box “snap fit” but I found it very difficult to get them to fit, so out came a knife and super glue and surprise surprise they fitted! I am sure someone who knows what they are doing will get them to fit better than me but it worked.

I will look at getting the Soviet sappers and recon team just because they are something different and I have a plan in mind for them in a small diorama so watch this blog. All in all a good investment that will be put to good use in the future.

 
As always remember you can find this beautiful set at best prices through our Ebay utility searcher, here.

1/72 Zvezda 5001 – T-34/76 model 1943 – Snap Kit

I’ve always liked this symbol of the Russian army and soon as I’ve heard about its release I wanted one for myself. This snap kit proved to be the perfect opportunity. Though apparently designed for wargaming, I’ve learned from Russian forums it has the most accurate dimensions in 1/72 scale.

It will turn out fine just out of the box, but I decided to upgrade it with a photo-etched set from Part and a gun barrel from Aber. Although designed for the ancient Eastern Express T-34/76 ’43 (late version with a raised commander cupola), the Part set fits almost perfectly. The snap technology is quite OK, I glued all plastic parts together for extra strength.

The Aber barrel however was a huge disappointment: is far too short. Even the label is wrong, as it designates a F-32 gun, while T-34 used the F-34 gun. So I was stuck with the gun barrel from the box, which looks just fine (you have to drill it though).

The mesh grills from the Part photo-etched set fits perfectly, except for the small pair on the top. I used a tow cable from Karaya and made few additions myself: lifting rings on the turret, power cable for the headlight, MG barrel from a syringe needle, holding straps for the fuel drums (which came from an IS-2 made by PST). The tracks are very easy to assemble, and are provided in hard plastic, not link&length but in large sections thus saving a lot of time. I also drilled the exhausts.

After spraying Tamiya white primer, I brushed four layers of Vallejo Russian Green from Model Color range. This particular range of paintings is perfect for hand brush.

The final touches were oil washes and some pigments, applied also wet and dry. The decals are not from the kit and were taken from my spare box. In conclusion, this kit is very well engineered, it’s easy to build. I highly recommend it to all T-34 fans and Braille lovers.

I hope you like it and you can buy this set at best prices here.

Zvezda 1/72 8027 – Medieval Field Powder Artillery

This is a very nice set…a combination of figure painting and a bit of model construction. The set contains 10 figures, of which only two are repeats, the cannonier firing the guns., 2 cannons, a horse team and sacks, buckets, rams and ammunition boxes.

All the poses are natural and fit perfectly to the artillery pieces.

The guns themselves
Each gun fits together perfectly…no glueing required whatsoever. I advise building each gun before painting. This makes painting them a bit more complicated than painting each section individually but it will save a lot of annoyance when putting the parts together and seeing your paintwork rub off!! The wheels can be painted seperately and fitted last. Here I advise a prefit. The holes in the wheels fit very tightly on the axles..and it may be necessary to open them up a bit with the tip of a toothpick. When you finally fit them, add a thin film of vaseline to the axle..it helps to ease them on.

Veuglaire. A chamber loaded piece. It was aimed through use of the bracket, raising or lowering the barrel by putting a pin through the bracket, the rear end of the barrel would then sit on this pin.
Serpentine. It got it´s name from the long barrel (snake like) This is also a chamber loaded piece, the aiming is, like the veuglair achieved by means of the (in this case) double bracket. Like the veuglaire, the barrel of this model can actually be elevated or depressed!!
Ribauldequin. The machine gun of the period. A multi barreled weapon, this would be used in rows on the battlefield or placed in gateways to concentrate the effct of all the barrels being fired in one go. This model has 8 barrels, a shield to protect the crew and spears at the front..used to keep off attackers.

Now on to the rest of the set,

The crews…I have added the crews to the guns…I won´t make any comment about them, apart from they are all historically correct and a real joy, there are enough in the set to service every weapon!! 😀

All figures and weapons painted with acrylics. Basework, Mixture from sand and woodglue, with natural and synthetic decoration.

 

You can buy this Zvezda set here.

News

Latest announces and releases.

A large bunch of new Caesar’s releases, pictures are available at Caesar’s site. http://www.miniknight.com/

H057 – Modern Israeli Defence Force
H060 – Modern British Army
H062 – Modern German Army (Bundeswehr)
H074 – WWII Late War German Army
H075 – WWII Italian Paratroopers
HB04 – WWII German Army with Camouflage Cape
7207 WWII German Krupp Protze Personnel Carrier Truck
7208 WWII German Sd. Kfz.10/4 with 20mm Flak 30
7209 WWII German Sd. Kfz.10 with 50mm Pak 38

Zvezda have released a new piece for the Art of Tactic game system.

6137 Soviet Reconnaissance set , which haves 4 excellent figures in this first time covered subject for our scale.

A very good news for WW2 and Modern fans, although they will took a couple of weeks or so to be available around the world. !

1/72 Zvezda 8043 Roman Imperial Legionaries

1/72 Zvezda 8043 Roman Imperial Legionaries

Just one of the unique figures from this good set, painted as example for a friend.
I used as reference back box illustration.
Base is a 2 euro cent.

The set haves the standard quality from Zvezda, with some separate parts which allow some easy modifications on figures.
This set has 28 figures in Roman “testudo” formation, which can be extend with more sets.

A complete review as always at PlasticSoldierreview.com

New Zvezda German 20-mm anti-aircraft gun FLAK-38

News form Zvezda, for Second World War.

A new set for a German 20mm anti aircraft gun and crew.
I think this set is also for the Zvezda game system “Art of tactic” recently released. We can expect more news in following months for this game.

I haven’t a pic of the content, so only box showed, but we can expect the usual good quality from Zvezda.
As the box advice about no glue required it seems to be a fast kit in soft plastic.



This subject was very good covered by ACE, but without crew, so this new one is very welcome !

New Zvezda’s sets for WWII [UPDATED]

[UPDATED] This sets seems to be expansion sets for the start up set of new game system, Art of Tactic. As seems on pics at Zvezda site, there are a few more poses on start up set, but no images for all content of the package are available. The game system includes vehicles in 1/100 scale, and seems to be a board game, which have been released with a game for the Russian campaign in 1941.

Hi all,
I inaugurate this section with a comment about new Zvezda’s releases.
I don’t know very well what to think about this new sets, they are four in total, GERMAN INFANTRY 1939-1942 6105 and GERMAN MACHINEGUN MG-34 WITH CREW 1939-42 6106, and Soviet infantry 1941-1945 6103 and SOVIET MACHINEGUN MAXIM WITH CREW 1941-43. 6104.


© 2005-2010 “Zvezda”

Infantry sets haves 10 figures in just three diferent poses ! nothing new to existing sets, plus two bases and cards for the new game system. Machine guns teams are composed of two identical weapons with two crew each, in two poses. They are sets for wargaming, but… just three poses ? ten figures ? sounds almost like a board game !! , some board games have more poses.
Germany sets are for years 1939 to 1942 and russian sets are for 1941 to 1943, so it seems there will be more sets to cover all the war.
Figures seems to have same good quality as Zveda usual do, but so less poses and figures, i don’t understand this.

Pictures are from Zveda’s artist published in their site.